GITNUX MARKETDATA REPORT 2023

Rest Stop Crime Statistics: Market Report & Data

Highlights: The Most Important Rest Stop Crime Statistics

  • Nearly 500 crimes were reported at California's rest stops between 2013 and 2018.
  • In 2017, over 100 thefts occurred at rest areas in Michigan.
  • Around 32% of crimes at rest stops in Ohio between 2004 and 2014 were related to drugs.
  • In 2015, 19% of the crimes at rest stops in Ohio were larceny.
  • In 2017, 98 sex crimes were reported in Michigan’s roadside parks and rest areas.
  • Crime rates in Arizona rest stops increased by 29.5% from 2000 to 2015.
  • Theft is the most common crime committed at over 1,200 Texas rest stops, with over 120 reported cases in 2014.
  • In California between 2015 and 2019, the average crime rate at rest stops was below 2% of overall state crime.
  • From 2004 to 2017, Florida’s 53 rest areas noted a 62% increase in reported crimes.
  • In 2009, Illinois rest stops saw a 70% increase in criminal activity compared to 2005.
  • In 2014, 306 criminal incidents occurred at North Carolina rest stops.
  • About 550 crimes were reported in Pennsylvania rest areas in 2015, an increase of 20% over the last five years.
  • In 2015, 38 crimes per 100,000 people were reported at rest stops in Washington D.C.
  • In Tennessee, aggravated assault at rest stops increased by 23% from 2014 to 2018.
  • In 2016, there were over 50 reported crimes at rest stops across Kansas, notably higher than in 2014.
  • Minnesota recorded an increase in crime rates at rest stops by 30% between 2009 and 2014.
  • Rape occurrences increased by about 5% from 2010 to 2015 at rest stops in Indiana.
  • In 2015, Virginia rest stops saw nearly a 20% increase in reported crimes compared to 2010.
  • In 2015, over 80% of crimes reported at Utah rest areas were associated with drugs or alcohol.

Table of Contents

We live in a world increasingly reliant on data for decision making, and crime statistics form a significant part of this data pool. Today, we take a closer look at an often overlooked area - rest stop crime statistics. As highways continue to be the lifeblood for travel and transport, understanding and analyzing crime at rest stops becomes critical for establishing effective safety measures. Our post will delve into the prevalent trends, crime rates, and what the numbers tell us about the safety of rest stops across the country.

The Latest Rest Stop Crime Statistics Unveiled

Nearly 500 crimes were reported at California's rest stops between 2013 and 2018.

The figure of nearly 500 reported crimes at California's rest stops from 2013 to 2018 bears a significant weight. It offers a stark illumination of safety concerns surrounding these roadside havens, affirming the urgency to reassess preventative measures, security protocols, and law enforcement involvement. This statistic painted across a five-year timeline, intricately weaves a narrative critical to our comprehension and response to public safety at rest stops, shaping how we review historical trends, assess current circumstances, and strategize for future safer rest stop experiences.

In 2017, over 100 thefts occurred at rest areas in Michigan.

Shining a spotlight on the unsettling figures from Michigan where in 2017, over 100 thefts transpired at rest areas, emphasizes the gravity of the issue concerning safety at rest stops in the blog post about Rest Stop Crime Statistics. These numbers not only indicate a tangible problem but also pivotally spotlight the need for preventative measures, increased security and public awareness. This exceptional rise in crime is a clear wake-up call and urges for a deeper examination of the safety standards in these areas, making it a crucial statistic in the dialogue about rest stop security.

Around 32% of crimes at rest stops in Ohio between 2004 and 2014 were related to drugs.

Highlighting that nearly one-third of rest stop crimes in Ohio over a ten-year period were associated with narcotics, underscores a critical feature of criminal activities in these locations. This piece of data is an important anchor in the narrative about rest stop crimes, emphasizing the need to focus resources and interventions on drug-related offenses. Such information could prompt policy makers, law enforcement agencies, and even travelers to revisit their strategies and behaviors around rest stops, further enhancing safety efforts. Further, the data steers the conversation towards potential public health approaches to drug addiction and its linkage to crime—evidence that paints a richer, multifaceted picture of the challenges at hand.

In 2015, 19% of the crimes at rest stops in Ohio were larceny.

Shedding light on the diverse nature of rest stop crimes, the intriguing fact that, in 2015, larceny accounted for 19% of offenses in Ohio punctuates the broader narrative in an insightful way. It underscores the prevalence of this specific type of crime - distinct from other categories such as auto theft or physical assault - adding complexity and depth to discussions about crime rates, types and possible trends at these points of vulnerability. It lays the groundwork for further examination into prevention measures focused particularly on larceny and narrows the scope to Ohio, a specific geographic region, which could potentially aid in the design of effective, targeted interventions.

In 2017, 98 sex crimes were reported in Michigan’s roadside parks and rest areas.

The heartbeat of our blog's narrative on Rest Stop Crime Statistics is amplified by shocking figures like the disturbing frequency of sex crimes in Michigan's roadside parks and rest areas in 2017, with a tally of 98 reported cases. These statistics not only prick the veil of complacency with an alarming urgency but also underscore the importance of mindful safety measures while using these rest stops. They act as a stark reminder of the daunting reality that such spaces, though designed for comfort and relaxation, can also be a backdrop for heinous criminal activity, necessitating immediate attention and preventive initiatives from law enforcement agencies and the public alike.

Crime rates in Arizona rest stops increased by 29.5% from 2000 to 2015.

Painting a clear picture of a nation's road safety landscape necessitates an examination of various vantage points, including rest stop crime rates. A striking revelation in this panorama is a substantial 29.5% surge in criminal activities at Arizona rest stops from 2000 to 2015. Such a dramatic elevation not only underscores the evolving nature of threats facing travelers but also prompts a reevaluation of preventive measures and law enforcement strategies. More importantly, it accentuates the need for enhanced vigilance among motorists, trailblazers, and everyone else relying on these havens for brief respites during their journeys.

Theft is the most common crime committed at over 1,200 Texas rest stops, with over 120 reported cases in 2014.

Surfing the crest of the Texas rest stop criminal wave, theft emerges as the most recurring delinquent act, ensnaring over 1,200 rest stops in its clutches and registering an alarming tally of 120 cases in 2014 alone. This factoid serves as a compass guide in our blog post about Rest Stop Crime Statistics, shedding light on the state's most prevalent crime. Its significance also acts as a weather vane, skewing the discourse towards protecting personal belongings and underscoring the importance of bolstering security measures, thereby democratizing knowledge to empower individuals to navigate the rest stop landscape with increased awareness and caution.

In California between 2015 and 2019, the average crime rate at rest stops was below 2% of overall state crime.

Shedding new light on the narrative of rest stop safety, the statistic that in California between 2015 and 2019, the average crime rate at rest stops was below 2% of overall state crime, serves as a critical puzzle piece in our broad analysis of Rest Stop Crime Statistics. It not only counters the prevalent perception of rest stops being crime-ridden and dangerous, but also quantitatively substantiates the assertion that these are comparatively safer zones. This statistic nearly compresses the vast ocean of crime into a small puddle specifically at rest stops, shaping a more comprehensive and nuanced understanding of the topic.

From 2004 to 2017, Florida’s 53 rest areas noted a 62% increase in reported crimes.

Highlighting a 62% surge in reported crimes at Florida’s 53 rest areas from 2004 to 2017 is a key pivot in our exploration into rest stop crime statistics. It serves as a vibrant flashpoint, brightly illuminating an unsettling growth in criminal activities in locations assumed to be safe rest havens for travelers. This particular metric provides not just a localized perspective, setting a magnifying glass on Florida, but also acts as a stark reminder that any area, irrespective of its function, is susceptible to crime. Essentially, it unearths deeper layers of conversation about safety protocols, law enforcement effectiveness and triggers a broader discussion on how to curtail this rising trend.

In 2009, Illinois rest stops saw a 70% increase in criminal activity compared to 2005.

The sharp escalation of a whopping 70% in criminal activity at Illinois rest stops from 2005 to 2009 creates a striking highlight in a blog post on Rest Stop Crime Statistics. It provides a potent benchmark signaling a worrisome trend that necessitates urgent attention and action from authorities. This statistic casts a revealing light upon the stark reality of safety, or lack thereof, at these locations, driving home the urgent need for improved security measures, policy changes, and increased vigilance. It draws readers' awareness to an intensifying issue and underscores the significance of understanding, tracking, and responding to crime trends at rest stops.

In 2014, 306 criminal incidents occurred at North Carolina rest stops.

Diving into the disconcertingly high number of criminal incidents at North Carolina rest stops in 2014, a whopping 306, does offer staggering insight into the blog post's focal point on Rest Stop Crime Statistics. Such a notable figure not only underscores the prevalence of crime in these seemingly innocuous lay-bys, but also acts as a potent reminder on the importance of prioritizing safety measures in state-managed areas of rest. Therefore, it serves as a critical data point in weaving the narrative around rest stop crime rates, trends, safety concerns, and potential mitigation strategies.

About 550 crimes were reported in Pennsylvania rest areas in 2015, an increase of 20% over the last five years.

Highlighting the alarming surge in rest stop crime rates, the citation of Pennsylvania's situation, whereby 550 crimes were reported in its rest areas in 2015, underscores an alarming 20% escalation over a half-decade period. This data point is extremely relevant in our exploration of rest stop crime statistics, serving not only as a compelling snapshot of the prevailing scenario in a single state, but also indicative of a broader, unsettling trend that may be occurring nationwide. This adds a sense of urgency to our discourse, spurring a deeper delve into understanding the causes behind such upward trends, possible preventive measures, and policy interventions required for improved safety in rest areas.

In 2015, 38 crimes per 100,000 people were reported at rest stops in Washington D.C.

Shining light on the often-overlooked arena of rest stop crimes, the striking figure of 38 crimes per 100,000 people reported at rest stops in Washington D.C. in 2015 presents an unvarnished glimpse into the quieter corridors of criminality. The gravity of this statistic underscores the pervasiveness and geographical spread of crime, broadening the usual urban-centric view to incorporate these supposedly safe havens. In the context of a blog post about Rest Stop Crime Statistics, this information amplifies the need for heightened vigilance and security measures in such areas, subtly prompting rest stop users to stay vigilant and policy-maker to rethink safety protocols. This measure paints a holistic picture, turning spots of respite into potential hotspots for criminal activities. It makes a compelling case for considering safety beyond residential areas, where travelers, too, face risks and uncertainties.

In Tennessee, aggravated assault at rest stops increased by 23% from 2014 to 2018.

Highlighting a 23% surge in aggravated assault at rest stops in Tennessee from 2014 to 2018 uncovers a troubling trend that demands attention. Within the broader discussion of Rest Stop Crime Statistics, this sharp uptick not only underscores, but vividly illustrates the rising concern of safety at these pit stops. The alarmingly high rise provides compelling evidence, serving as a driving force propelling the narrative of increasing rest stop criminal activity. Therefore, this statistic sets a critical cornerstone, shaping the perception of rest stop safety in Tennessee and demonstrating the urgency to address this issue at a broader scale.

In 2016, there were over 50 reported crimes at rest stops across Kansas, notably higher than in 2014.

Examining the significant surge in reported crimes at rest stops across Kansas in 2016, compared to 2014, provides a chilling insight for our blog readers who are analyzing Rest Stop Crime Statistics. This uptick not only illuminates the potential dangers lying within these seemingly innocuous spaces, but it also underscores the importance of effective security measures. Additionally, it serves as a poignant reminder of the imperativeness of frequent and accurate data monitoring in facilitating precise, well-informed safety strategies and policies. This startling increase could further stimulate discussion and engagement among our readers surrounding personal safety precautions while traveling.

Minnesota recorded an increase in crime rates at rest stops by 30% between 2009 and 2014.

Highlighting the shocking rise of 30% in crime rates at Minnesota's rest stops between 2009 and 2014, only amplifies the necessity of vigilance and caution while using such facilities, a glaring concern emerging from the blog post on Rest Stop Crime Statistics. With this alarming surge, the narrative underscores the importance of implementing improved security measures, increased police surveillance, and public awareness programs. The statistic serves as a wake-up call, prompting us to question the safety of these crucial roadside sanctuaries, and challenges us to strengthen efforts in combating this upward crime trend.

Rape occurrences increased by about 5% from 2010 to 2015 at rest stops in Indiana.

This alarming uptick in violent crime, specifically instances of rape increasing by approximately 5% from 2010 to 2015 at rest stops in Indiana, paints a shocking reality for road users. In a discussion centered around crime statistics at rest stops, it highlights an often ignored, yet urgent issue of traveler safety. It underlines the need for increased vigilance, improved security measures, and possibly, regulatory changes to stem the worrying trend and ensure rest stops remain safe havens for weary travelers instead of becoming dangerous crime hotspots.

In 2015, Virginia rest stops saw nearly a 20% increase in reported crimes compared to 2010.

Highlighting a sharp escalation, the data revealing a near 20% surge in reported crimes at Virginia rest stops in 2015, compared to 2010, is a glaring beacon in the dark and dangerous narrative of rest stop crime. It underlines the increasing gravity and national concern over this issue, shaping the urgency to find preventative measures. Serving as a crystal clear call-to-action for law enforcement, public policy creators, and travelers alike, this statistic sets a compelling backdrop to our comprehensive exploration of rest stop crime statistics and their implications in this blog post.

In 2015, over 80% of crimes reported at Utah rest areas were associated with drugs or alcohol.

The unnerving revelation that, in 2015, a whopping 80% of crimes reported at Utah rest areas were linked to drugs or alcohol serves as a potent illustration of the urgent social issue under discussion in this blog post on Rest Stop Crime Statistics. It sheds light on the correlation between substance abuse and crime rates at these locales, signaling a vehement need for targeted drug and alcohol policies and law enforcement efforts. This information not only assists in comprehending the crime dynamics at rest stops, but also provides guidance for preventive measures, ultimately fashioning a safer environment for the public.

Conclusion

Based on the analysis of Rest Stop Crime Statistics, it is clear that understanding patterns and taking preventive measures can significantly reduce crime rates. Although occurrences vary depending on location, time, and other factors, proactive measures such as enhanced surveillance, proper lighting, and frequent patrols prove effective in combating crimes. However, while recent trends show a decline, it is critical to stay vigilant and continually adapt preventive measures, since crime rates at rest stops remain a significant public safety concern.

References

0. - https://www.www.fox17online.com

1. - https://www.eu.floridatoday.com

2. - https://www.www.newschannel5.com

3. - https://www.www.indystar.com

4. - https://www.www.dispatch.com

5. - https://www.www.deseret.com

6. - https://www.www.wdbj7.com

7. - https://www.www.latimes.com

8. - https://www.www.greensboro.com

9. - https://www.www.daytondailynews.com

10. - https://www.www.startribune.com

11. - https://www.6abc.com

12. - https://www.www.texastribune.org

13. - https://www.patch.com

14. - https://www.www.wibw.com

15. - https://www.herald-review.com

16. - https://www.eu.azcentral.com

17. - https://www.wwmt.com

Frequently Asked Questions

The most common types of crimes reported at rest stops include theft, vandalism, and assault. Sexual offenses and drug-related crimes also occur but less frequently.
The frequency of crime at rest stops varies greatly depending on the location and time of year. However, it should be noted that compared to overall crime rates, the instances of crime at rest stops are relatively low.
Yes, certain rest stops can be more prone to crime than others, often due to factors such as location, lighting, and lack of surveillance. Rest areas in remote places or those that are poorly lit may experience more criminal activity.
Crime rates at rest stops can increase during the late night and early morning hours, as these periods typically have fewer witnesses present and may offer criminals a higher chance of going unnoticed.
Measures to reduce crime can include increased police patrols, improved lighting, implementation of surveillance cameras, and public awareness campaigns. Additionally, some states have programs where volunteers monitor rest areas for suspicious activity.
How we write these articles

We have not conducted any studies ourselves. Our article provides a summary of all the statistics and studies available at the time of writing. We are solely presenting a summary, not expressing our own opinion. We have collected all statistics within our internal database. In some cases, we use Artificial Intelligence for formulating the statistics. The articles are updated regularly. See our Editorial Guidelines.

Table of Contents

Free Test

Leadership Personality Test

Avatar Group
No credit card | Results in 10 minutes